Insurers Face Potential $1 Billion in Claims for Las Vegas Mass Shooting

Insurance Journal

Bloomberg

 

The deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history is adding to soaring costs for insurance companies, which are already taking a beating this year from an onslaught of hurricanes, earthquakes and wildfires.

The industry may have to shell out more than $1 billion for the Las Vegas massacre, insurance executives say. Acts of a solo gunman, who killed almost 60 people and injured about 500 others when he fired into the crowd of a country music festival last month from his Mandalay Bay hotel room, have resulted in multiple lawsuits. Victims have accused the hotel and its owner, MGM Resorts International, and concert promoter Live Nation Entertainment Inc., of failing to protect people at the event. Continue reading Insurers Face Potential $1 Billion in Claims for Las Vegas Mass Shooting

Insured Loss Estimates from California Wildfires Now up to $8 Billion

Insurance Journal

Insured losses from the siege of California wildfires could possibly reach $8 billion, according to new estimates released on Friday by catastrophe modeler RMS.

The firm now estimates the insured loss for the wildfires impacting Sonoma, Napa, Solano, Lake and Mendocino counties will reach between $6 billion and $8 billion. Continue reading Insured Loss Estimates from California Wildfires Now up to $8 Billion

Starbucks in Legal Battle over California’s Cancer Warning Law

Insurance Journal

If you happen to buy a cup of coffee in California and it comes with a cancer warning, don’t panic – it’s just the law.

No scientific study says consuming java in moderation is bad for your health – and some even show it’s good for you. But winning a reprieve from the state’s toxics disclosure requirement isn’t easy. Coffee merchants have been fighting in a Los Angeles court for six years, so far without success, to prove beyond the shadow of a doubt that the 600-year-old beverage isn’t harmful. Continue reading Starbucks in Legal Battle over California’s Cancer Warning Law

Study Ranks Driving Skills of Californians 39th in U.S., Nevadans 40th

WIAA

California and Nevada motorists rated an average grade of 77 out of 100, which placed California 39th and Nevada 40th among all states and the District of Columbia, according to a report by the website Everquote that made evaluations based on the percentage of drivers who use phones while on the road, speed, accelerate aggressively, brake “harshly” or turn poorly. The score for both states was lower than the average of 79 for the nation. Everquote tracked the driving behavior in this past year of persons who downloaded its app, which measured and ranked driving skills on a scale of 0 to 100.

By type of driving behavior, California and Nevada motorists rated the following scores based on these percentages of drivers who engaged in these dangerous actions while on an average journey:

 Use phones while driving: California motorists rated an 81 based on 35% of motorists in the state who did this, while Nevada finished with an 80 as 36% of drivers used phones. California’s score was equal to the average for Western states and greater than the national average of 80.

Speed: California got an 82 because 32% of drivers did this, while Nevada rated a 79 based on 40% of motorists speeding. The averages for the West and nationally were 83 and 79, respectively.

Accelerate aggressively: California 79 as 28% of drivers engaged in this behavior; Nevada 82 as 25% of motorists did this. The averages for the West and nationally were 86 and 85, respectively.

Brake harshly: California 77 based on 41% of drivers braking harshly; Nevada 82 with 33% of motorists doing so. The averages for the West and nationally were 86 and 83, respectively.

Turn poorly California 84 as only 18% of drivers turned poorly; Nevada 83 based on 19% of motorists doing this. The averages for the West and nationally were 87 and 86, respectively.

Owner of Hotel Cleaning Firm in California Pleads Guilty to Workers’ Comp Fraud

Insurance Journal

Hyok Kwon, owner of Good Neighbor Services, a janitorial company that provided services to some of San Diego’s most exclusive hotels and resorts, has pleaded yesterday to seven felonies, including premium and employment tax fraud. Continue reading Owner of Hotel Cleaning Firm in California Pleads Guilty to Workers’ Comp Fraud

Dummies Taking Hits for Drone Safety

Bloomberg, Insurance Journal

Hank sat impassively on a Virginia Tech athletic field, ready to take it on the chin for the future of drone commerce.

About 30 yards away, an eight-rotor unmanned copter hovered, buzzing like a swarm of bees. The 21-pound drone tilted forward, accelerated sharply and slammed into Hank’s head, smacking the crash-test dummy’s neck backward and embedding shards of shattered propeller in his plastic face. Continue reading Dummies Taking Hits for Drone Safety

California Fault Could Yield M7.4 Quake, Study Shows

Insurance Journal

An earthquake fault running from San Diego Bay to Los Angeles is capable of producing a magnitude-7.4 earthquake that could affect some of the region’s most densely populated areas, according to a new study. Continue reading California Fault Could Yield M7.4 Quake, Study Shows

How Tattoo Artists Are Like Dentists

Insurance Journal

Getting a tattoo may hurt, but giving one is no picnic, either.

That’s the finding of what its authors say is the first study ever to directly measure the physical stresses that lead to aches and pains in tattoo artists—workers who support a multibillion-dollar American industry, but who as independent contractors often don’t have workers’ compensation if they get injured. Continue reading How Tattoo Artists Are Like Dentists

Driver Deaths Rose 6% in 2016, Topping 40,000

Bloomberg, Insurance Journal

U.S. motor vehicle accident deaths last year topped 40,000 for the first time since 2007 as cheap gasoline and a healthy economy encouraged motorists to drive more, according to new estimates released by the National Safety Council. Continue reading Driver Deaths Rose 6% in 2016, Topping 40,000

Supreme Court Refuses to Block NFL’s $765 Million Concussion Accord

Insurance Journal

The U.S. Supreme Court let stand the National Football League’s $765 million concussion settlement, turning away contentions by former players that the accord won’t adequately compensate them for the brain damage they may have suffered. Continue reading Supreme Court Refuses to Block NFL’s $765 Million Concussion Accord

Drivers Leaving Keys for Thieves a Growing Problem, Says Insurers’ Crime Bureau

Insurance Journal

Last year, one out of every eight car thefts was a freebie for the thief because the driver left the keys or the car access device inside.

It’s a growing problem according to a report from the insurance industry’s National Insurance Crime Bureau(NICB). The 57,096 thefts with keys left in the car in 2015 amounted to a 22 percent increase over the previous year. Over the past three years, this kind of theft grew by 31 percent.

In 2015, there was a theft every six and one-half minutes where the driver left the keys or the FOB inside. Continue reading Drivers Leaving Keys for Thieves a Growing Problem, Says Insurers’ Crime Bureau

Why Claims Under Americans with Disabilities Act Are Rising

Insurance Journal

Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Title III lawsuits are up 63 percent over 2015, according to law firm Seyfarth Shaw.

ADA Title III prohibits businesses open to the public from discriminating on the basis of disability. The act applies to a variety of businesses and restaurants, including warehouses, movie theaters, schools, office buildings, day care facilities, doctors’ offices and any new construction of same must comply with the ADA construction standards. Continue reading Why Claims Under Americans with Disabilities Act Are Rising